Best web hosting and content management

WordPress is most popular content management system that powers more than 32 percent of the world wide web. It’s success is understandable. WordPress is easy to use, and it boasts an incredible library of themes and plug-ins that enhance your site in many ways. In fact, WordPress is the foundation for millions of websites, from personal pages to big brand online destinations, If you’re thinking about building a website and don’t want to code it from scratch, WordPress is the way to go. Most web hosts offer some form of WordPress-specific service, be it an optimized or a managed environment. Both types boast platforms specifically designed for WordPress. In each, the CMS comes preinstalled, so you don’t have to download and set up a WordPress installation as you’d do when using a traditional web hosting environment.

 

Note that we’re speaking here of the WordPress.org CMS that acts as the foundation for your self-hosted website, not WordPress.com. The latter CMS has more in common with website builders than traditional website hosting. Depending on the web host, you can enjoy a huge variety of site-friendly features, including automatic data backups, page caching, and automatic CMS updates. Note that some web hosts restrict a short list of plug-ins that may duplicate features already built into the optimized or managed setup or negatively affect your site’s performance. Managed WordPress builds upon optimized WordPress hosting in a few key areas. Your website will be assigned a customer support squad that isn’t just super knowledgeable in all things WordPress, but one that also ensures that you don’t have to ever worry about going into your site’s back end to do anything other than create content. Managed WordPress hosts typically offer site staging for posts and pages so that you can test them before they go live, automatic malware detection and removal and enhanced security too.

It’s important to understand that the dividing line between optimized WordPress and managed WordPress can be quite thin, and also that each site may have its own slightly different definitions for the two terms. You should contact a web host’s customer support team to learn the specifics of its WordPress hosting. (Source: in.pcmag.com)